Hispanic Students’ Sense of Control in Relation to Post-Secondary Enrollment Outcomes

Abstract:

U.S. Hispanics are the fastest growing minority population pursuing post-secondary education, yet their bachelor degree attainment lags behind other ethnic–racial groups. Previous work supports the theory that having a high locus of control (LOC) can enable persistence in challenging post-secondary settings. We examine LOC as a potential mitigate against low college enrollment, and hypothesize that Hispanic students’ capability to enroll in post-secondary institutions (e.g., community college, 4-year colleges), in the face of personal, academic, and financial challenges, is likely predicated on their belief that they control their academic futures. We modelled college enrollment using a path-model using a generalized structural equation modeling (GSEM) approach. Our findings indicate that LOC decreases the likelihood of Hispanic students’ post-secondary enrollment. This work advances the current state of knowledge on how we understand Hispanic students’ transition to college, and informs the development of potential interventions supporting the academic success of this growing and significant community.

Cite:

Aguilar, S.J., Kim, A.Y. (2019). Hispanic Students’ Sense of Control in Relation to Post-Secondary Enrollment Outcomes. Social Sciences, 8, 67. DOI: 10.3390/socsci8020067

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